Khasi Hills Community REDD+ Project

Meghalaya, India

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The cloud forests of the East Khasi Hills are a globally important biodiversity region, and is home to a variety of species of flora and fauna, many of them endemic, rare or endangered.
The majority of forests in this region are community forests and are managed by their respective Hima, or kingdom, a form of indigenous government. The Hima, along with the Village Councils are responsible for the protection of the forests and allocation of its resources. Unsustainable extraction of forest resources coupled with the encroachment of land has led to the degradation of these forests. The project aims to conserve existing forests and restore degraded ones while addressing the drivers of degradation by facilitating alternative livelihood options and income generation activities as well as planning the sustainable extraction of forest resources. The project is wholly community-owned and managed through a federation of the Hima that are a part of the project area.

Woman representatives

The community is encouraged to include women in its traditionally male Dorbars or village councils. The project tries to ensure that there is a woman representative from each Hima employed as a Community Facilitator.

Employement

Members of the local community are employed by the project for implementation and monitoring. Income-generating activities such as piggeries and poultry farms are supported through the project. Sustainable agriculture practices are also promoted.

An average of 134 tCO2e/ha/year

sequesteration over 30 years.

Fuel efficient cookstoves

are distributed to decrease firewood usage. The project also helps facilitate LPG connections where possible.

Woodlots are demarcated

Woodlots are demarcated for the sustainable extraction of firewood for use by the local community. Fuel-efficient cookstoves are distributed to decrease firewood usage. The project also helps facilitate LPG connections where possible. Sustainable agriculture practices are also promoted.

Conservation of these forests

Meghalaya’s forests are known to be biodiversity hotspots, and are home to a number of endemic flora and fauna. Conservation of these forests will help protect habitats and preserve ecosystems.

Background of Project

Unsustainable extraction of forest resources and encroachment has seen degradation of community forests, including Sacred Groves, in the East Khasi Hills. These forests are biodiversity hotspots and are home to a number of endemic or endangered flora and fauna, which are under threat due to loss of forests.

The Project

The project seeks to address drivers of deforestation and degradation that contribute to forest loss and conserve or restore around 20,000 hectares of community forests while improving livelihoods and incomes through a number of supplementary project activities. The project is a community-owned and managed project, developed and managed by a federation of Hima(kingdoms), a form of indigenous government.

The Benefits

The project addresses a number of SDGs with a number of environmental and socio-economic benefits.